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Idaho Entrepreneurs returns

Boise State University announces renewal of a new partnership with old friends; working together to produce and market the second edition of a book that profiles the lives of some of Idaho’s great entrepreneurs; with all book-sale royalties going to an endowed BSU scholarship fund.

BSU’s old friends are the author, former State Senator Hal Bunderson, who in his professional career was a CPA and an audit partner in the international public accounting and consulting firm of Arthur Andersen & Co. – Los Angeles, Atlanta, Boise and Salt Lake City offices. Over his career, Bunderson worked with nearly a hundred entrepreneurial businesses. Randy Stapilus is the president and publisher of Ridenbaugh Press.

The first edition of “Idaho Entrepreneurs” was published in 1992. Bunderson wrote the book at the behest of former BSU President John Keiser who wrote the Introduction. The Mary Kay and Hal Bunderson – Arthur Andersen Excellence in Accounting Scholarship Fund is an endowed fund that has been awarding annual scholarships since 1994.

The book’s second edition is titled, “Idaho Entrepreneurs Five Case Studies of How Six Entrepreneurs Became Successful.” Bunderson said, “While these entrepreneurs are from past generations, the underlying principles that defines the character and performance of a successful entrepreneur are similar in every age. Reading about these entrepreneurs can help us all. We can see, with hindsight, the benefits of choosing wisely and the adverse and sometimes devastating consequences of poor choices.”

Bunderson dedicated the book “To every person who has a business idea that they believe can become a thriving enterprise, and Act!” On the same page, Bunderson lists 12 characteristics of successful entrepreneurs.

Bunderson said, “This is a history book. It has as much to do about Idaho and United States history as it does about successful businesses. The work and influence of all of these entrepreneurs, their families and employees have had profound effects in Idaho, surrounding states, the nation and in some cases, the world.”

Bunderson concludes by posing and answering the question, “Can anyone be an entrepreneur? The answer generally is yes, if they want to follow the relevant ethical and business principles exemplified by our profiled Idaho entrepreneurs. Become an expert in a chosen business, nourish innovation and creativity, enjoy the work and, most importantly, never give up, in spite of setbacks.”

Bunderson quotes Jack Simplot on the topic how to be successful, “… be disciplined in financial matters; get a ‘taw (a marble player’s shooter),’ add to it all the money you can, keep it wisely invested and do not spend any of it. Simplot points out that over time that investment and its compounding appreciation will make you a millionaire.”